Back to Top

Blog

6 Tips for Cavity-Free Holidays

Timing matters

Saliva production increases during meals and helps cancel out acids produced by bacteria in your mouth and also helps rinse away food particles. If you like sweets and other sugary foods, eat them with meals or shortly after mealtime.

Be picky if it’s sticky

When it comes to picking healthy snacks, many people put dried fruit at the top of the list. But many dried fruits are sticky and sticky foods tend to stay on the teeth longer than other types of food. If you find yourself eating a lot of dried fruits such as cranberries or raisins, make sure to rinse your mouth with water and brush carefully.

Limit your alcohol intake

Try to drink a lot of water alongside your alcoholic drinks. And remember: Too much alcohol can dry out your mouth.

Take it easy on the hard candies

Some candies are more problematic than others. Hard candies can put your teeth at risk because, in addition to being full of sugar, they are also known to cause broken or chipped teeth. (Be careful not to break or chip your teeth when eating nuts as well!)

Watch out for starchy foods

These are sneaky because they often get trapped in your teeth. If you choose to indulge in chips and cakes, take extra care when you floss that day to remove all the food particles that can lead to plaque build-up.

You can still have fun

So, what can you eat? Lots of stuff! Prioritize lean protein, such as lean beef, skinless poultry and fish. Make sure to vary your diet. Eat whole grains and choose low-fat or fat-free dairy foods. The holidays are a great time of year to start thinking about healthy habits. If you do snack, make it a nutritious choice such as cheese, yogurt, fruits, and vegetables for your overall health and the health of your teeth.

Dental Symptoms

Toothache

If your mouth or jaw hurt, it could from a toothache. Toothaches sometimes indicate a cavity but they can also signal gum disease. In some cases, an ache may be a sign of an abscess or impacted tooth. Do not wait for a toothache to get better on its own, it should be evaluated by a dentist quickly to find out the cause of the problem and prevent the problem from getting worse.

Sensitive Teeth

If your teeth hurt after you drink hot or cold beverages, you may have sensitive teeth. This can be the result of tooth decay, fractured teeth, worn fillings, gum disease, worn tooth enamel or an exposed tooth root due to gum recession. Treatment will depend on the cause of sensitivity. If you’re concerned regarding the sensitivity of your teeth, see your dentist for diagnosis and treatment options.

Bleeding or Sore Gums

Bleeding or sore gums may be a symptom of gingivitis, an early and reversible stage of gum disease or just the results of brushing too hard or beginning a new flossing routine. If your gums bleed regularly or enough to worry you, make an appointment with your dentist or physician, it could be a sign that something else is wrong.

Mouth Sores

Types of mouth sores include canker sores, cold sores, leukoplakia, and moniliasis. Each of these types of sores vary in their severity, and can indicate different types of dental issues. Mouth sores can be a symptom of a disease or disorder, infections from bacteria, viruses or fungus, irritation caused by braces, dentures or the sharp edges of a broken tooth or filling. Your dentist should examine any mouth sore that lasts a week or longer.

Bad Breath

Bad breath can be caused by what you eat, not cleaning your mouth, dry mouth, smoking or other medical conditions. Persistent bad breath may be a warning sign of gum disease. Brushing twice a day and flossing daily are essential to reducing bad breath and preventing gum disease. Brushing your tongue will help too. If you’re concerned regarding the cause of your bad breath, see your dentist. They can determine the cause and treatment plan.

Dry Mouth

If you have dry mouth it may be a symptom of a medical disorder or a side effect of certain medications. Saliva is the mouth’s primary defense against tooth decay. It washes away food and other debris, neutralizes acids produced by bacteria in the mouth and provides disease-fighting substances throughout the mouth. Your dentist can recommend ways to restore moisture.

Oral Piercing Infection

Oral piercings can produce a wide range of issues for your health, oral and otherwise. Your mouth is home to very large amounts of bacteria, creating an ideal place for an infection to start. If you’ve got any signs of infection, swelling, pain, fever, chills, shaking or a red-streaked appearance around the site of the piercing, contact your dentist or physician immediately.

Cracked or Broken Teeth
A cracked or broken tooth can happen for a variety of reasons—brittle teeth, teeth grinding, or acute tooth injury like a sports accident. The crack could be invisible to the naked eye and even X-ray, but they will be incredibly painful and can cause bigger problems if left untreated. If you experience pain when chewing, see your dentist. They can diagnose the cause and develop a plan for treatment.

Everything you Need to Know About Scaling and Root Planing

Scaling and Root Planing is a process of deep cleaning below the gumline that helps to treat gum disease.

Why Do You Need It?

Gum disease is caused by a sticky film of bacteria known as plaque. Plaque is always forming on your teeth. However, if they aren’t cleaned well the bacteria in plaque will cause your gums to become inflamed. When this happens, your gums will pull away from your teeth and form gaps known as pockets. Plaque then gets trapped in these pockets and can’t be removed with regular brushing. If untreated, gum disease may lead to bone and tooth loss.

If gum disease is caught early and hasn’t caused any damage to the structures below the gum line, professional cleaning is needed. If the pockets between your gums and teeth are too deep, scaling and root planing might be required.

What Happens During Scaling and Root Planing?

This deep cleaning process has 2 components. Scaling is when your dentist removes all the plaque and tartar (hardened plaque) on top of and below the gumline. Your dentist can then begin root planing, smoothing out your teeth roots to assist your gums to reattach to your teeth. Scaling and Root Planing could take more than one visit to complete and may require a local anesthetic.

After Care Tips

After a deep cleaning, you may have sensitivity in your teeth and gums for a couple of days up to a week. Additionally, your gums could also be swollen, feel tender and bleed. To prevent infection and control pain or assist you to heal, your dentist can prescribe a pill or mouth rinse. Your dentist may also insert medication directly into the pocket that was cleaned. Your dentist can schedule a follow-up visit to see how your gums have healed and measure the depth of your pockets. Good dental care is essential to help keep gum disease from becoming serious or reoccur. Brush your teeth twice a day with a soft brush, clean between your teeth daily, follow your diet, avoid using tobacco and visit your dentist often.

Top 5 Risk Factors for Oral Cancer

It’s estimated that over 51,000 people will be diagnosed with oral cancer and cancers of the throat, tonsils, and back of the tongue each year. A dentist can check for symptoms of oral cancer during a scheduled check-up. Early detection of such cancers is beneficial for treatment, but you should also know the risk factors and habits that might put you at risk.  Changing a few potentially harmful habits may help reduce your chances of developing oral cancer. Read on to find out the top risk factors.

Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

The sexually transmitted disease is now associated with around 9,000 cases of head and neck cancer (explicitly those happening at the back of the tongue, in or around the tonsils) diagnosed every year in the United States according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). People who are diagnosed with HPV related cancer tend to be young and non-smokers. People with HPV positive cancer have a lower risk of death or recurrence even though these cancers are often diagnosed at a later stage because it develops in difficult-to-detect areas.

Gender

Men are twice as likely to get oral cancer. The American Cancer Society attributes this to higher rates of liquor and tobacco use by men and more men of younger age are being diagnosed with HPV related form of oral cancer.

Age

Most people who are diagnosed with oral cancer are 55 or older. However, according to the American Cancer Society HPV related oral cancers are now being diagnosed in younger people as well. 

Tobacco

Whether you smoke it or chew tobacco, it drastically increases your risk for oral cancer. Smoking can cause oral cancer, as well as cancer in other parts of the body. Pipe smokers are also at a higher risk of developing cancer in their lips. Smokeless tobacco, like chew, can lead to numerous issues in your mouth, the most serious being cancer of the cheeks, gums, and lips.

Alcohol

According to the American Cancer Society, 7 of 10 oral cancer patients are heavy drinkers. Heavy drinking, as characterized by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is an average of two drinks per day or more for men and an average of more than one drink daily for women. If you are a heavy drinker and a heavy smoker, your chances of developing oral cancer significantly.

Ready for a New
Dental Experience?

Schedule A Free Consultation

Contact Us

  1. *
  2. *
  3. *
 

*Required

Location

9001, 2nd floor, North Main Street,
Dayton, Ohio- 45415.
Map & Directions

Phone: 937.836.7282
Fax: 937.836.7394